Wild Woodgas Stove Recipe: Twist Bread Hot Dogs

My wild cooking project wasn’t the only cooking project I’m working on over the summer: I was also working on veganising recipes from the Nordic Baking Book. The two combined with Pinnbrôd. Or at least that’s what it’s called in Sweden. When I posted it to instagram I was told the German word is Stockbrot.

Both the Nordic Baking Book and Wild Baking recommend making the bread twists fat enough to slip a cooked sausage in; lubricant may be required. Just as god intended. Vegan sausages are better though. They don’t take as long to cook, so you can just wrap the dough round the sausage and by the time the bread is done the sausage is too.

twist sea

The challenge then is getting the stove to the right temperature. You’ll want to burn it down until there are no more flames. The other trick is to find the right size of sausage. The Taifun cocktail sausages are perfect for the size of the stove.

To Make The Dough:

1 cup of plain flour
Two big pinches of salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
5 tablespoons of water

Mix the dough together just before you go out, and pop in a container.

In The Wild:

Dough
Hot dogs

Allow the flames on the stove to die down and work while the embers are still hot.

Place the hot dog on a skewer.

Break off about a tablespoon of dough and roll it out. Wrap it in a thin layer around the hot dog.

Cook over the embers, twisting constantly until the bread is cooked through.

twist

Wild Woodgas Stove Recipe: Potato Curry

Each year I set myself a summer project. In the past I’ve learned how to spin, sewn one dress for every week of the six week holidays and, of course, each year I aim to get the flat so tidy I never have to clean again.  This year my challenge is to cook outside more often. As a result I’ve bought myself a Wild Woodgas Stove.

with a veiw

I’m aiming to get one new recipe written up each week that’s been cooked on my new stove. This first one is for a mild, sweet and sour potato curry. It’s in two parts. First you cook the curry paste at home, then you add some water and a can of new potatoes out in the wild to make it a meal. I use the term ‘wild’ loosely. Theses recipes aren’t necessarily going to work for backpacking. It’s more cooking-but-a-little-lazier and with a great view.

Potato curry

This serves two, with flatbreads for dipping

To make the paste

1 tbsp oil
1 teaspoon of cumin seeds
1 teaspoon of black mustard seed.
Pinch of Asafoetida
2 teaspoons of brown sugar
5 tablespoons of tomato paste
2 tablespoons of tamarind paste
1 teaspoon of salt
1 tablespoon of coriander
1 1/2 teaspoon turmeric

Heat the oil over a medium-high heat. When hot add the cumin and mustard seed.

As the mustard seeds start to pop, add the asafoetida, sugar, tomato, tamarind, and salt. Stir until the sugar dissolves.

Add coriander and turmeric. Turn the heat to low and reduce the water. The paste is done when it just coats the bottom of the pan – if you drag a spoon through it it should leave a gap in the sauce.

paste

Let it cool and then jar it up.

In the wild

1 can of boiled new potatoes
Water
Your jar of curry paste

Drain the new potatoes and add them to a pan.

stovecooking

Put in the curry paste and enough water so that the potatoes are almost all covered.

Pop the pan over the fire and heat until everything is cooked through.

cury

Recipe: Wild Garlic Pesto

Wild garlic, after it’s picked, can wilt really fast. To keep it fresh after picking I wrapped it in a damp tea towel and popped it in a sealable box in the fridge. Or you could make it into pesto straight away.

 

Wild Garlic Pesto

About 20 leaves of wild garlic

8 walnuts

190ml (3/4 cup) olive oil

This is a simple two-step process: put it in the blender and blend it up.

It’s served here with spinach pasta and broccoli but it can be used just like any other pesto.

Recipe: Wild Garlic Bread

Wild garlic, allium ursinum, is currently in season here in sunny south Devon. The beautiful garlic-scented plant is everywhere right now and it’s delicious.

The leaves are my favourite part. I pick two or three from each plant so it can keep on growing. Patches here can get pretty large so you can get a decent harvest that way. This garlic bread ‘recipe’ is nice and easy. Great for after a hard day’s forage.

Wild Garlic Bread

 

1 demi baguette

About 6 leaves of wild garlic

About 4 tablespoons of vegan butter

Pre heat the oven to 200°c

Make cuts in the baguette. You want about nine cuts, on the diagonal, about three quarters of the way through.

Make the garlic butter: finely chop the garlic leaves and beat into the butter.

Spoon the garlic into the cuts, about a teaspoon in each one.

Wrap the baguette in foil and bake in the oven for twenty minutes.

Recipe: Baked Black-eyed Beans

I work at the local vegan coffee shop, The Kind Grind, and for the past month we’ve been tinkering with our menu. We’re a coffee shop so we’re keeping it simple but bringing in more quality ingredients and home made touches.

These beans might just be my favourite part of the new menu. They appear in the ‘Big V’, our vegan cooked breakfast, or on a slice of sourdough for fancy beans on toast.

Ingredients (serves 2)

  • 1 400g can of tomatoes
  • 2 teaspoons of cumin
  • 2 teaspoon of coriander
  • 1 teaspoon of smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon of liquid smoke
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 400g can of black eyed beans

And to serve:

  • Four slices of sourdough toast
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • About a tablespoon of chopped parsley

Put the chopped tomatoes in a blender along with all of the spices, liquid smoke and salt. Add 200ml of water and blend.

Add the beans and the tomato mix into a saucepan and cook on a low-medium heat for 45 minutes. Taste to check the seasoning. You might need a bit more salt, or smoke.

To serve, drizzle the olive oil over the toast and spoon on the beans. Sprinkle over the parsley and enjoy.

Recipe: Curry Rice (Vegan Mofo 2018)

Today’s theme for Vegan Mofo is Emoji Inspired. It’s a pretty good opportunity to dust off my recipe for Curry Rice.

with emoji

When I started my adventure in Japanese-style curry I was following this recipe from Just Hungry. What sold me on it was the description: “The best way to describe it is probably to say it’s like a English style stew with curry.” So I thought it would be something like a more filling version of chip shop curry. Which it is. I love it.

Along the way I’ve made plenty of adjustments. To start with I took the meat out. Today we’ve used a seitan but I also like to use cubes of fried tofu. This has the side effect of making the dish quicker to cook.

I also like to muck around with the veg. We eat this curry fairly regularly between autumn and spring, often to use up the last of the root veg in our Riverford Box. I’ve used carrot, squash, sweet potato, swede, turnip… anything really. It’s a really good clean-out-the-fridge meal. I also sometimes use edamame instead of peas, just because Kate likes them better.

curry mix

And finally I do use blocks of Japanese curry, instead of making my own roux. I like S&B because you can find it practically everywhere now (or order from Japan Centre) but I use double the amount. After all this is my Cheating English Lady’s Japanese Curry.

Ingredients

(serves 2)

  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 can of tomatoes, blended
  • One cup of assorted mixed root veggies, diced
  • Two squares of S&B Golden Curry
  • Half a cup of diced beef-style seitan or cubes of deep fried tofu or more veggies
  • Half a cup of peas or edamame
  • Rice to serve

Brown the onion in oil over a medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for a further 30 seconds or so.

Add the tomatoes into the pan. Toss in the root veggies, curry and around 1 1/2 cups of water.

uncooked

Cook until the vegetables are done. This will be around 20-30 minutes depending on what veggies you put in and how done you like them (Kate prefers hers mushy and textureless but I’m doing the cooking so…)

Add the seitan or tofu and the peas or edamame and cook for a further 5 minutes or so until they are heated through.

Serve with rice.

IMG_1071

 

Recipe: hot chocolate dessert

Today is the Late Summer Bank Holiday in England and Wales. The phrase ‘late summer’ might give you visions of evenings on the beach, putting on a fleece as the sun sets and the air starts to cool. However, as any Brit will tell you, bank holidays mean awful weather. That doesn’t stop half the population waiting for hours in traffic though, as they optimistically head to the coast on Friday and disappointedly head home on Monday. I’d rather stay at home with some warm comfort food, like this simple hot chocolate dessert.

dessert

Ingredients:

  • 20g cocoa power
  • 30g caster sugar
  • 200ml oat milk
  • 20g cornflour
  • 20ml water

Method:

Put the cocoa powder, caster sugar, and oat milk in a saucepan, whisk together, and place over a medium heat.

Put the cornflour and water in a small bowl and stir to make a thin paste, known as a ‘slack’.

Pour the slack into the saucepan. The heat will cause the cornflour to thicken the dessert, so whisk it continuously to avoid the bottom layer thickening first.

Once it has thickened to the point that the whisk leaves faint trails, pour the dessert into a bowl to serve.